Chinese Male Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence: A Three-Pillar Approach to Analyze Men's Delayed Help-Seeking Decisions

Wai Hung Wallace Tsang, T. M.Simon Chan, Monit Cheung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) literature has addressed differential socialization for designing interventions, mainly helping female victims and male perpetrators. From a gender-specific perspective, this study examines the abused men's postponed decisions to disclose victimization or seek help. Through individual interviews, 10 Chinese male IPV survivors in Hong Kong described their help-seeking journey. A three-pillar approach is applied to guide the analysis in terms of psychological factors, cultural barriers, and decisional challenges when men are seeking help. Results reveal negative influences bearing on male survivors' help-seeking behaviors and support how men can rebuild positive personal strengths after experiencing the impact of abuse on oneself and the family. Service providers must identify barriers of delayed help-seeking decisions and treat IPV survivors with respect and acceptance to facilitate abuse disclosure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-109
Number of pages18
JournalViolence and Victims
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • delayed OR postponed decision in help-seeking
  • domestic violence
  • Hong Kong
  • male IPV survivors
  • protective of the spouse
  • vulnerability

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