Mapping the interrelationships between self-concept, motivation and university experience among students of self-financing higher education institutions in Hong Kong

Phoebe Wong, Connie Mak, Peggy M.L. Ng, Jessie Zhao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explores the interrelationships between self-concept, motivation and academic and social experience among students from self-financing higher education institutions in Hong Kong. Although prior studies have investigated different aspects of self that drive various types of motivation in students’ academic and social experience, most of them are related to publicly funded universities only. This study aims to extend our current understanding to the context of self-financing higher education, which is an alternative to students whose academic results are not good enough to secure tertiary placements at publicly funded universities. Using qualitative approach and the technique of friendship pair, 26 students from 12 self-financing higher education institutions in Hong Kong were recruited for semi-structured interviews. Data analysis revealed that participants constructed two dimensions of the self: the personal (i.e. the actual academic self, the possible academic self, the spiritual self and the extended self) and relational (i.e. the familial self and the social self) dimensions in the light of their university experience. The findings provide a better understanding of the contemporary university experience in relation to self and motivation among students studying at self-financing higher education institutions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
JournalAsia Pacific Education Review
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2017

Keywords

  • Motivation
  • Self-concept
  • Self-financing higher education
  • University experience

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